Habakkuk's Prayer

Services

Sunday - 9:15 AM Sunday School, 10:30 AM Worship Service

by: Denise Robinson

07/16/2021

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"O Lord, I have heard of your renown, and I stand in awe, O Lord, of your work. In our own time revive it; in our own time make it known; in wrath may you remember mercy." (Habakkuk 3:1).


These words are the beginning to the prayer of Habakkuk, an Old Testament prophet about whom we know very little. From the words of the small book, it is clear that Habakkuk, as he looks at events around him affecting himself and his nation, feels God is absent. He is aware that it is more likely that the people have absented themselves from God rather than the reverse, and so declares his confidence in God as he prays for revival and mercy. Twice he stresses his desire that this happen soon ("in our time").

Generation after generation have echoed these words. We look around and see a broken, hurting, divided world, where God is seemingly absent. We look at individual lives, sometimes our own, and see pain, brokenness, and division. Where is God? Habakkuk reminds us that God is with us. He prays to God in confidence that God hears his prayer. He knows God's works throughout history and stands in awe. He knows that the problem is not with God; the people and the nation need a revival where hearts turn back to God and God's mercy is experienced.

May we, today, pray this same prayer for one another and for our world.
"O Lord, I have heard of your renown, and I stand in awe, O Lord, of your work. In our own time revive it; in our own time make it known; in wrath may you remember mercy." (Habakkuk 3:1).


These words are the beginning to the prayer of Habakkuk, an Old Testament prophet about whom we know very little. From the words of the small book, it is clear that Habakkuk, as he looks at events around him affecting himself and his nation, feels God is absent. He is aware that it is more likely that the people have absented themselves from God rather than the reverse, and so declares his confidence in God as he prays for revival and mercy. Twice he stresses his desire that this happen soon ("in our time").

Generation after generation have echoed these words. We look around and see a broken, hurting, divided world, where God is seemingly absent. We look at individual lives, sometimes our own, and see pain, brokenness, and division. Where is God? Habakkuk reminds us that God is with us. He prays to God in confidence that God hears his prayer. He knows God's works throughout history and stands in awe. He knows that the problem is not with God; the people and the nation need a revival where hearts turn back to God and God's mercy is experienced.

May we, today, pray this same prayer for one another and for our world.
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