How We Deal with Others Matters

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Sunday - 9:15 AM Sunday School, 10:30 AM Worship Service

by: Denise Robinson

04/12/2021

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Some of today's verses may remind us of the teachings of Jesus - which makes sense since Jesus quoted from the Psalms during his ministry. Try to get along with others, don't put yourself above others, worry about your own self-control. All good advice as we conclude Ch. 25:


If your enemies are hungry, give them bread to eat; and if they are thirsty, give them water to drink; for you will heap coals of fire on their heads, and the Lord will reward you. The north wind produces rain, and a backbiting tongue, angry looks. It is better to live in a corner of the housetop than in a house shared with a contentious spouse. Like cold water to a thirsty soul, so is good news from a far country. Like a muddied spring or a polluted fountain are the righteous who give way before the wicked. It is not good to eat much honey, or to seek honor on top of honor. Like a city breached, without walls, is one who lacks self-control.   (Prov. 25:21-28)

Don't just be kind to your friends, but include your enemies; as they accept your food and water, it will bring in them a feeling of shame even to the point of feeling real pain - but God will reward you. The second verse interesting, because anyone in Palestine would know that the wind from the west brings rain, not the wind from the north. So, what is Solomon saying? If wind from the north (where there's no water) brings rain, there's a hidden or mysterious meaning to the words. Likewise, a backbiting tongue is a "hidden" one; it speaks ill of people, not to their face, but behind their back; because it is hidden and the source may be a mystery, it only stirs up anger. Finally, don't give in to what is wicked, keep your pride in check, and remember that self-restraint is a virtue.

Meditation: How do we, if we are righteous, confront what is wicked in a way that is loving? I am not at all fond of the phrase, "Hate the sin, love the sinner," because too often what is focused on, and remembered most, is the first word: "hate." The Bible says we are not to judge (condemn) one another, but we are called to have standards and, as Christians, we are accountable to one another. It's a delicate balance and, on top of it all, we are to always remember that we sin as well. What do these words mean for you and how you interact with others?
Some of today's verses may remind us of the teachings of Jesus - which makes sense since Jesus quoted from the Psalms during his ministry. Try to get along with others, don't put yourself above others, worry about your own self-control. All good advice as we conclude Ch. 25:


If your enemies are hungry, give them bread to eat; and if they are thirsty, give them water to drink; for you will heap coals of fire on their heads, and the Lord will reward you. The north wind produces rain, and a backbiting tongue, angry looks. It is better to live in a corner of the housetop than in a house shared with a contentious spouse. Like cold water to a thirsty soul, so is good news from a far country. Like a muddied spring or a polluted fountain are the righteous who give way before the wicked. It is not good to eat much honey, or to seek honor on top of honor. Like a city breached, without walls, is one who lacks self-control.   (Prov. 25:21-28)

Don't just be kind to your friends, but include your enemies; as they accept your food and water, it will bring in them a feeling of shame even to the point of feeling real pain - but God will reward you. The second verse interesting, because anyone in Palestine would know that the wind from the west brings rain, not the wind from the north. So, what is Solomon saying? If wind from the north (where there's no water) brings rain, there's a hidden or mysterious meaning to the words. Likewise, a backbiting tongue is a "hidden" one; it speaks ill of people, not to their face, but behind their back; because it is hidden and the source may be a mystery, it only stirs up anger. Finally, don't give in to what is wicked, keep your pride in check, and remember that self-restraint is a virtue.

Meditation: How do we, if we are righteous, confront what is wicked in a way that is loving? I am not at all fond of the phrase, "Hate the sin, love the sinner," because too often what is focused on, and remembered most, is the first word: "hate." The Bible says we are not to judge (condemn) one another, but we are called to have standards and, as Christians, we are accountable to one another. It's a delicate balance and, on top of it all, we are to always remember that we sin as well. What do these words mean for you and how you interact with others?
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